Root Canal Treatment

A root canal is the space within the root of a tooth.

It is part of a naturally occurring space within a tooth that consists of the pulp chamber (within the coronal part of the tooth), the main canal(s), and more intricate anatomical branches that may connect the root canals to each other or to the surface of the root.

The Fundamentals For A Root Canal Therapy

RCT is one name that gives many patients shivers when told about it. However, in reality, it is not that bad. Infact, it is an instant pain reliever and the best treatment to retain the original teeth. A Root canal treated tooth serves its purpose and function just as a healthy tooth.

A root canal is a capillary, which runs from the base of the root of the tooth to the middle of the crown (the visible part of the tooth). The root canal carries the pulp (a network of blood and nerve cells), which brings the tooth to life.

The nerve of the tooth gets damaged due to many reasons. One of the main causes is cavity in the tooth that grows deeper and touches the nerve. Since the cavity is filled with bacteria, the root canal gets inflamed and causes pain. Other reasons that may damage the teeth are accidental cracks or infection from gums reaching to the base of roots. In such cases, root canal treatments can easily stabilise the position.

There are two ways to get relief from the pain: perform the root canal therapy, or pull the tooth, clean the gum below, and replace the tooth with a denture or bridge. We advise removing teeth as a last resort natural teeth are the ones best suited for the mouth.

It’s important to have root canal therapy done quickly. The bacteria will travel down the canal to the root and into the jawbone. If this happens, the pain of your toothache will spread to your jaw. Even more important, the infection can cause your jawbone to deteriorate and weaken the structure that holds your teeth.

The best way to avoid root canals is to take good daily care of your teeth to prevent the growth and spread of bacteria.

Dental Health: Symptoms Of Endodontic Disease

Common Symptoms requiring an RCT:

  • Severe tooth pain, typically relieved by cold water and increases with the intake of hot liquids.
  • Pain worsens when you lie down and reduces when you sit up.
  • Pain stays for a long time after consuming cold things.
  • Swelling around the tooth.
  • Constant tooth pain
  • Pain when chewing.
  • Tooth pain referred to head and ears as well.
  • Tooth sensitivity on consuming sweets.

If you have any of the above stated symptoms, it would be advisable that you visit your dentist, since he is the best person to judge whether you have a root canal disease or not, as some of these symptoms may be due to other problems as well.

Why May Endodontic Disease Cause Swelling?


When the pulp tissue becomes severely diseased and necrotic, the resultant infection can spread from inside the tooth into the adjacent bone and soft tissues. As a result, swelling can occur in the tissues immediately surrounding the tooth. If this situation is not treated and the disease process is not kept under control by the body’s defences, the infection can begin to spread into other tissue spaces, such as those around the eye or in the neck. In some situations, this can become a serious medical emergency.

Facts about Root Canal Treatment

What Are the Goals of Root Canal Treatment?
As an alternative to an extraction, the goals of root canal treatment are to save the tooth and allow it to be retained in the mouth for many years in a state of health, function, and comfort. Root canal treatment is directed towards removing diseased tissue from the inside of the tooth and subsequently filling and sealing the root canal space in order to minimize the possibility of future re-infection.

Why Is Root Canal Treatment Called Endodontic Treatment?
Endodontic is a word composed of two Greek words, “endo” meaning “inside,” and “odont” meaning “tooth.” Endodontics is that branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases that arise from the soft tissues inside the tooth. These tissues are referred to as the dental pulp and they occupy the root canal space. Thus, endodontic treatment is also called root canal treatment.

If a Tooth Has Had Root Canal Treatment, Is It a Dead Tooth?

Root canal treatment does not kill a tooth. Even though root canal treatment removes the pulp tissue from inside the tooth, the tooth is by no means “dead.” Following successful endodontic treatment, the tooth continues to receive its blood supply and nourishment from the surrounding tissues and the supporting bone. The body’s immune system continues to recognize an endodontically treated tooth as viable and healthy, just as it recognizes any other normal non-treated tooth. An endodontically treated tooth generally requires a protective crown and, once this restoration has been completed, the tooth continues to function as an integral component of the dental arch. A tooth that has had root canal treatment and has been properly restored is no more susceptible to fracture, decay, or gum disease than any other tooth.

Alternatives To Root Canal Treatment

The only alternative to root canal treatment is the extraction of the problematic tooth. It is wise to consider all of the implications of losing a tooth before having it removed.

The decision should not be made hastily or because the tooth is painful. If pain is present and the dentist thinks that the tooth can be saved, the discomfort can first be relieved and then the alternatives explored.

The discussion about tooth replacement alternatives after extraction can be complex because each individual situation is unique and, at times, various specialists may need to be consulted.The usual alternatives that a patient has after tooth extraction are:

  • A restored dental implant. This restoration involves a surgical procedure to insert the dental implant into the bone, a healing phase of several months, and a final restorative phase, which is similar to having a single tooth crown. Significant time and laboratory costs are involved.
  • A fixed bridge. Fabricating a fixed bridge requires cutting down (“preparing”) the teeth next to the missing tooth so that they can receive the artificial crowns that support the replacement tooth.

 

  • A removable partial denture. These appliances restore function and esthetics and can be inserted into the mouth and removed at will. Although many teeth are successfully replaced with removable prosthetic appliances, patients may initially find them cumbersome. Removable partial dentures may also temporarily alter phonetics as well as place unfavourable forces on the supporting teeth and soft tissues. There may be significant costs associated with this restoration.
  • Not replacing the extracted tooth. This is a poor choice in most situations. Leaving a space after extraction can lead to long-term problems with teeth shifting and tipping, destabilization of the biting system, and esthetic changes in the profile of the face. Financially and psychologically, this could turn out to be the most costly choice over the lifetime of the patient

 

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